5 Feel Good Fashion Brands for 2016

5 feel good fashion brands for 2016

5 feel good fashion brands for 2016

When we say ethical, charitable fashion, what comes into your mind? Probably not trend-led fashion that’s for sure but ethical fashion has come a long way. It’s no longer an array of hippie style brands and flip flops. There are fashion brands that are making a real difference to the lives of others and supporting communities in underdeveloped countries that would otherwise be unable to function and earn a living.

These are the brands we should be looking to and supporting. With many high street retailers cottoning on to the demands of consumers for Fairtrade and sustainable clothing, this is certainly not just a trend but hopefully an evolution of the way we view fashion. Much of which has stemmed from damning documentaries which reveal the ways in which our fast fashion is produced, often in extremely unethical conditions.

The following brands offer a stylish (yes, really!) selection of varying products and support amazing causes whilst manufacturing their products in a sustainable and ethical manner. Want guilt free fashion? Then read on…

1. FEED

Founded in the US (but with international shipping don’t worry!) the FEED brand asks if a bag can change a life? Answer = yes it can. For each bag you purchase from FEED the brand donate a corresponding number of vital meals to underprivileged children. You can even see how many meals your bag is donating, it really does change lives plus you get a super cute new bag. Available in a range of styles from totes, to cross-body but the bucket bag is our favourite!

2. Made

UK based jewellery brand Made is a firm favourite amongst fashion lovers with impressive collaborations to date including Louis Vuitton, Tommy Hilfiger and Whistles to name a few! The brand has a strong focus on Fairtrade practices and sustainability, dedicated to using the most environmentally sound materials as possible. Since 2005, Made have worked with their own workshop in Kenya, harnessing the talent of local artisans based in the community whilst providing them with a stable income.

3. Miki Moko

A relatively new designer eyewear brand, Miki Moko stands out from the rest due to their unique business model. It works differently to most shopping experience in which the customer chooses the price they want to pay for their new pair of stylish frames. Yes, that’s right! Pick your price, but bear in mind 50% is donated to charity. The brand donate the 50% of your order to the Nepal Youth Foundation and you can even see the live counter on the homepage. We love these pale green chunky framed glasses, just perfect for spring!

4. ASOS Africa

It’s great to see internet fashion giant ASOS giving their hand to a sustainable and ethical sub-brand. The ASOS Africa collection burst onto the scene in 2011 and has been providing fun, unique prints and crazy co-ords ever since. Supporting sustainability, the brand partners with Kenyan workshop SOKO to work towards creating long-term sustainable employment in Kenyan communities.

5. TOMS

Ok, so this is the one most people will probably be familiar with due to the previous popularity of their ‘give one get one’ espadrilles. It’s worth adding to the list to refresh your minds as the brand have recently developed their range and are now much more than just beach shoes. The new range of Toms backpacks feature a wide range of styles and designs and for each bag purchased a safe birth for a mother and baby in need is provided. Now if that’s not a reason to buy yourself a new backpack we don’t know what is.

Will you be introducing ethical brands into your shopping for 2016?

Photo courtesy of: feedprojects.com

Tilly-Jayne Kidman

Tilly is a graduate in fashion marketing and currently works in social media. She writes for various publications including the Huffington Post as well as her own fashion and lifestyle blog tillyjayne.com. In her spare time she's usually wandering around her home city of Cambridge, making travel plans or finding a new restaurant to try out.

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