Making Room for Books – Storage Tips for Avid Readers

Reading is an undeniably healthy activity (is there anything better than a good book and a cup of coffee?); it keeps your mind sharp and open, whilst being a highly enjoyable pass time. But the more we read, the more books we acquire. Before we know it we have more books than we know what to do with, and the clutter this can cause is arguably bad for the mind and soul.

Owner and founder of Store That, East London’s secure self-storage units, Richard Enright, provides some unique insight into the creative ways you can store your precious books and keep your space clutter free.

Make use of ALL your space

The first mistake you can make when attempting to maximise your space is assuming that you’ve run out of it. Unless you’re an eccentric hoarder, this is usually not the case. Sometimes a little DIY might be needed to get the shelving where you need it, but if you’re prepared to make some minimal effort for the sake of your precious books, your storage problems may just be resolved.

Do you have the underside of your stairs showing? If you do, it’s probably quite safe to assume that they’re bare. After a little handy-work, each of those steps could be a potential bookshelf. Maybe you have a small unused ledge somewhere in your property – there’s no reason why this shouldn’t be considered as a viable storage space. Even spaces under beds and benches are perfect for a custom bookshelf – maybe on wheels for ease of access.

No matter your home situation, there is likely to be some unused space just begging for a little innovation.

Declutter to make room for what’s important

If you’re really struggling to find space for your beloved books, the next step might be to create some space for yourself. Do you have shelves filled with old nick-nacks, dying plants and obsolete DVDs that you keep telling yourself are worth keeping? If any of his sounds familiar, perhaps it’s time to have a good think about what’s worth keeping and what’s worth chucking!

If you haven’t had a clear out for a while, you might be surprised by how much space you can create by throwing away, recycling, selling, donating or renting more storage space for a lot of your old bits and pieces. You might find yourself freeing up a whole closet worth of space, in which case you could develop your own mini-library.

This exciting prospect isn’t possible for everyone, however there are alternative routes in setting up a personal library; having your own storage unit can be the perfect safe haven for your books. With varying amounts of affordable space at your fingertips, whether you’re finding a home for your books or looking to make more space for them at home, renting a storage unit has never made more sense.

Be prepared to reach up high

A classic, and often huge, chunk of empty space found inside of most homes is the area where wall meets ceiling. You will often find this area is unused for good reason: no one can reach up there. However, with the helping hand of a simple stool or small stepladder, these spaces are an untapped storage saviour! The sheer amount of books that could line the top of your walls is unfathomable, to the point where if implemented well, this tip may be the only one you ever need when inquiring after creative book storage.

Store That can help!

The fact remains that maybe you simply don’t have enough room for your precious books as well as all your other household items, or maybe you don’t fancy any of the DIY or home improvement. Whatever the case, a storage unit might be what’s missing from your life. 

Store That would be more than capable at keeping anything you own safe – whether that’s a selection of your books or a variety of other items that you’ve cleared out to make room for something much more important.

For more information on the safe and secure service Store That provides, please visit: www.storethat.co.uk 

Diana Simpson

Diana is a passionate journalist and a curious soul who is on the quest of finding what she loves the most; coffee, dogs, books or traveling? Born and bred in London, writing is her healing power.

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